One bit, don’t quit!

Those are the words that have become Kiah Twisselman’s catchphrase after losing over 125 pounds and becoming a full-time life and weight loss coach.

Born and raised on her family’s cattle ranch in Carrisa Plains, Twisselman has a deep love for the beef and agriculture industry.

After graduating from UC Davis, Twisselman worked on the Kentucky Beef Council and in charge of their nutrition program.

“I felt very conflicted in that role. Not because I didn’t believe in what we were sharing in terms of beef and protein’s role in a heart-healthy diet and lifestyle,” said Twisselman.

She continued, “I grew up on a cattle ranch, I believe in the beef industry with all my heart and soul, but I felt like such a hypocrite standing up in front of the room telling-the general public ‘yeah beef is so great for your health’ without being a vision of health myself.”

Before boarding a plane to a conference for the beef council, Twisselman picked up Rachel Hollis’s book ‘Girl, Wash Your Face.’ Then Twisselman had her ah-ha moment, if you will, after having to ask for a seatbelt extender on the plane for the first time.

After that moment, Twisselman decided she needed to make some changes, but this time things were going to be different, “I feel like I knew this time that something felt different, and I think that really started within me.”

Twisselman began to follow Rachel Hollis’s ‘Five to Thrive’ in October 2018. Hollis’s ‘Five to Thrive’ is a list of five things she does every day that has drastically changed her life, energy levels, and how she shows up for her family.

It wasn’t her first time trying to make a change in her health, but this time she knew it was different.

“I think that I knew this time when I made the commitment it was a real commitment to myself. It wasn’t a commitment to a diet; it wasn’t a commitment to keto; it wasn’t a commitment to weight watchers. It was a commitment to myself, and that felt different,” says Twisselman.

Early in her health journey, Twisselman began documenting her experience. For the first few months, she kept those videos and photos to herself. But after Kiah started to see changes happening and knew she would follow through, she began to share her story with the world.

Twisselman shared, “The way I was approaching it felt different this time it was more from a place of ‘I’m going to learn to love myself and show up and care for myself the way I deserve instead of starting a diet from I hate myself, so I’m going to fix the problem.”

Soon, women from all over the country began contacting Twisselman asking if she was coaching others on weight loss.

In August 2019, Twisselman began coaching people one on one in life and weight loss, and in July 2020, she became a full-time life coach.

“It was completely unexpected to me that I would be here, one day being an example to other people, being in a place where I can empower so many other women that are that are walking their own journey, and I am so grateful that I’m able to say I’m here to help you because I did it myself and I have all this proof of what it takes,” said Twisselman.

Since October 2018, Twisselman has lost over 125 pounds and has been featured on national television and magazines like Good Morning America, Access Hollywood, People Magazine, and Women’s Health.

Twisselman never went to the gym. She learned how to exercise from home and make small changes in her habits one bit at a time.

When it comes to dieting, Twisselman says, “The problem is I think our society and our culture feeds us this belief that diets are what are going to solve the “problem” and I think that’s why the diet culture perpetuates itself and its because we never get to the core of what the real issue is which in my opinion has to do more about our relationship with ourselves than it does the diet or foods that we eat or whether we do the exercise.”

You can follow Kiah Twisselman on her continuous health journey on Facebook @coachkiah and learn more about her coaching opportunities at coachkiah.com.

Getting through this together, Atascadero